Welcome to the Small Business Ideas Forum! We are a community of over 100,000 small business folks with over 163,000 posts for you to browse. We pride ourselves on being the friendliest forum you will find and we'd love to have you as a member of our community. Please take a moment and register for a free account. If you need any help, please contact Chris Logan.

Small Business Ideas Forum

Small Business Ideas Forum

A friendly place to share small business ideas and knowledge, ask questions, find help and encourage others that are involved in the small business industry. Topics include small business marketing, generating revenue and small business computing.

Go Back   Small Business Ideas Forum > Small Business Marketing - Online > Viral Marketing
Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 27th October 2004, 10:36 PM   #11
T.Mayer
Member
 
T.Mayer's Avatar
 

Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 53
Default

Hello Barry,
I could not agree more on the importance of one's company name. If you are Pepsi, Harley Davidson, or Microsoft, no problem.

As for little old me, ell that is a different take.

A Domain name must be:
Short and sharp Meaningful-conveys a clear message easy to spell easy to remember unique,descriptive,and "you" solid,classic,NOT hokey On the web today,I find it's all about fiding your "Niche" And there is no better way to convey that than in your name. To both the search engines and to your would be visitor. Barrys-Cookies.com You will be 1 in millions, yawn.
Barrys-Cookies-For-Diabetics.com You are the specialized source I was looking for! I like hyphens BarryscookiesforDiabetics.com hmmmmmm. no
If one needs help to pick Domain name.try http://www.NameBoy.com
http://homepageuniverse.com http://www.startstorm.com
Also a Theresus can give you a few new suggestions to put together. (you may have on on your window's word processor.)
Once you find that great name,chech for it's availability. Better-Who-Is.com can check that for you free.

The most desired piece of real estate on the web today is .com
Regards,
Tanna

T.Mayer is offline   Reply With Quote
Register or log in to remove this ad.
Old 24th November 2004, 12:15 PM   #12
madcat_
Member
 

Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: MI
Posts: 8
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bragadocchio
Or a directory after a very rude person?
Pardon for my ignorance but I didn't get this
so what's the answer???? LOL

madcat_ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th November 2004, 04:15 PM   #13
bragadocchio
VIP Contributor
 
bragadocchio's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Delaware
Posts: 187
Default

Hi madcat

The word "yahoo" originally came from Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, and describes a race of creatures known for their uncivility, rudeness, lack of education and learning, and sheer unpleasantness.

When Gulliver was first amongst the Houyhnhnms, he was mistaken for a Yahoo, who look, I guess, remarkably like humans.

Quote:
The curiosity and impatience of my master were so great, that he spent many hours of his leisure to instruct me. He was convinced (as he afterwards told me) that I must be a YAHOO; but my teachableness, civility, and cleanliness, astonished him; which were qualities altogether opposite to those animals.
and

Quote:
In about ten weeks time, I was able to understand most of his questions; and in three months, could give him some tolerable answers. He was extremely curious to know "from what part of the country I came, and how I was taught to imitate a rational creature; because the YAHOOS (whom he saw I exactly resembled in my head, hands, and face, that were only visible), with some appearance of cunning, and the strongest disposition to mischief, were observed to be the most unteachable of all brutes."
It's probably not the impression that David Filo and Jerry Yang wanted to make, but it certainly is better than "Jerry's Guide to the World Wide Web".

And besides, they really weren't traveling all of the way back to Swift's use of the word:

Quote:
The name Yahoo! is an acronym for "Yet Another Hierarchical Officious Oracle," but Filo and Yang insist they selected the name because they liked the general definition of a yahoo: "rude, unsophisticated, uncouth."
It does have a lot going for it as a name though. It's short, easy to remember, and kind of whimsical.

__________________
Bill Slawski | SEO by the SEA | "Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity." ~ Charles Mingus
bragadocchio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26th November 2004, 01:38 PM   #14
Anita
Senior Member
 
Anita's Avatar
 

Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 158
Send a message via AIM to Anita Send a message via Yahoo to Anita Send a message via Skype™ to Anita
Lightbulb Hi, looks like everyone is recovering from turkey day...

This is an intriguing thread.

One other thought comes into play. It can be hard to choose a company name due to trademark issues.

If you've ever done a trademark search these days, you know that any name consisting of interesting business words is probably taken already. That can make it tough to find a business name that is available.

That's why you see so many "made up" words as company names these days. Names like "Agilisys" "Athersys" "Ayalogic" and "Accelent."

Nowadays it seems it is only when you make up a word that you have a shot at the name -- without ending up on the wrong side of a trademark dispute.

Anita

__________________
Anita Campbell, Editor
Small Business Trends
Let's connect on Twitter: @smallbiztrends
Anita is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th November 2004, 01:05 AM   #15
bragadocchio
VIP Contributor
 
bragadocchio's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Delaware
Posts: 187
Default Trade Names and Fictitious Names

Hi Anita

Trademarks can be difficult to search, but you raise a very good point.

Finding if someone holds a trademark can be really difficult if you consider that trademarks can be registered on an international, national, or state level, or not even registered at all - actually use in commerce can qualify as a "trademark." There are services that you can use to investigate whether someone else is using a specific name as a trademark.

A person can start out by searching on their own before contacting a service to help. The US Patent and Trademark Office allows you to do some searching. And a look around using a few search engines might show you people using the same name in commerce. But not every business that might be using the name may be online, or is easy to find online.

One of the very good reasons to trademark a business name, or product or service line name on a country level - a federal level in the US, is to give other people notice that the name is in use. It's a practice that can potentially help by letting others know the name is taken.

Another concern with names comes when you find the name you want is being used by someone else as a "Fictitious Name" or "Trade Name" (sometimes referred to as "doing business as" names or dba's). Registries of these names are often maintained on a county level in the US.

Trade names often aren't monitored as closely as a name used to create a corporation or limited liability company in most states, and it is possible that more than one business may end up with the same fictitious name in a county registry. But, if there is a dispute over the use of a name, the one that is registered first could attempt to claim a greater right to use the name based upon that registration.

Trade names could be used by a sole proprietorship or partnership that wasn't formed through a legal filing with a state Division of Corporations (or similar office).

They could also be a name used by a corporation or limited liability company for a specific line of business. For instance, The May Department Stores Company operates a number of department stores under trade names that you may recognize from your local mall, such as Lord & Taylor, or Filene's, or Strawbridge's, and a dozen others.

It's not uncommon for restaurants or stores to use trade names. How many business signs do you see that end in "inc." or "corporation" or "llc"?

In many states, these lists of "Fictitious names" are maintained at the highest level trial court in each county instead of through a Division of Corporations. Those offices will often do a search for you to see if someone else is using the name, or require that you perform the search. If you intend to use one of these types of names in more than one county, you may want to search the registries for all of the counties where you will be conducting business.

I don't believe that most registries of fictitious names are available online.

__________________
Bill Slawski | SEO by the SEA | "Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity." ~ Charles Mingus
bragadocchio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th November 2004, 07:49 PM   #16
Anita
Senior Member
 
Anita's Avatar
 

Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 158
Send a message via AIM to Anita Send a message via Yahoo to Anita Send a message via Skype™ to Anita
Smile The Records Haven't Kept Up With the Times

Hi Bragadocchio,

Good points all.

Isn't it interesting that the state laws and records haven't kept up with the times? I mean, searching by county records harkens back to the day when all business was local.

It sounds soooooo 19th century.

In today's world, even a one-person online business is likely to be doing interstate commerce, and quite possibly global business. Yet the legal recordkeeping regarding ficticious names assumes businesses may be operating county by county.

Best,
Anita

__________________
Anita Campbell, Editor
Small Business Trends
Let's connect on Twitter: @smallbiztrends
Anita is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th November 2004, 08:52 PM   #17
bragadocchio
VIP Contributor
 
bragadocchio's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Delaware
Posts: 187
Default

So true.

But I think I have seen some signs that government is trying to keep pace.

I'm excited that my local Clerk of the Peace Office is taking all of its marriage records (more than 400,000 index cards, hundreds of large records books, and hundreds of reels of microfilm), and putting all of them on 30 DVDs. It will supposedly make a search for older records take seconds instead of the days or even weeks that it does presently.

I'm excited not because I really have a need for those records, but rather because it's a sign that government is working to catch up, and work smarter.

Quote:
In today's world, even a one-person online business is likely to be doing interstate commerce, and quite possibly global business.
That's one of the things I love about the web.

It doesn't matter whether your company's payroll has one person on it, or one thousand, and that doesn't stop you from holding conversations with people as near as Ohio, or as far as the UK or Japan or New Zealand.


Quote:
Yet the legal recordkeeping regarding ficticious names assumes businesses may be operating county by county.
I think that there's still a place for that type of registration. Especially when you actually have a physical presence in an area. I recently took a trip across state lines into Maryland, and noticed a fastfood restaurant with the same name as a small Delaware chain that has been around since the 50s. It was pretty clear from their colors, their signs, and their building's architecture that they weren't owned by the same people. Both have a right to use the name. If one of the chains decides to expand across state lines, they may have to think about what to name themselves in the new location. Some businesses do still operate county-by-county.


Quote:
In today's world, even a one-person online business is likely to be doing interstate commerce, and quite possibly global business.
I've noticed that domain name registration is becoming as important to a business online as a fictitious name registration can be to an endeavor that is more limited in its reach. Thankfully, it's a lot easier to check and register a domain name than it is to check a fictitious name.

__________________
Bill Slawski | SEO by the SEA | "Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity." ~ Charles Mingus
bragadocchio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th March 2005, 01:38 PM   #18
fast-pack.com
Member
 

Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Madison, FL
Posts: 11
Send a message via AIM to fast-pack.com Send a message via Yahoo to fast-pack.com
Default

Hello All!,
What a GREAT Topic!!! Have a question and looking for any feedback you can offer. About 6 years ago I started a shipping supply business. Named "Fast-Pack.com". Well, if I knew then what I do now, I would have found a name without the hypen (luckily a competitor does not own the fastpack.com domain with out the hyphen). About a year ago, we incorporated under the name "Fastpack Packaging", but have continued using the fast-pack.com domain and DBA fast-pack.com .

My first question is this, Do I leave it the way it is and keep operating under fast-pack.com, using the same logo, and domain or change over to the fastpack packaging name and logo, .... and domain, or new name and logo and old fast-pack.com domain, along with the new fastpackpackaging forwarding to exsisting website?????? Very confusing, huh?

I have great rankings in the search engines, so do not weant to change to the new domain name, but maybe promote it and have it forward to the fast-pack domain?? I also feel that the new name and logo sound and look much more proffesional, but long and would my customers remember fastpackpackaging.com over fast-pack.com ( don't foget the hyphen! )

I know I have confused you, as I just confused myself, but if you can make any sense out of this, I would appreciate any input you can offer. Thanks Again!

P.S. just a side note, fast-pack.com , sucks for viral marketing!!!! Argh! Lets say a customer is talking to a friend that asks, where did you get that widget?? The customer says, fast pack dot com! ARGH! Not fast hyphen pack dot com . My tip to all, never build a business around a domain with a hyphen, if you are looking for viral marketing!

fast-pack.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th March 2005, 04:37 PM   #19
4ndr3w
VIP Contributor
 
4ndr3w's Avatar
 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: In my inbox.
Posts: 264
Send a message via AIM to 4ndr3w

Default

If I recall correctly, an entity can operate with more than one fictitious name. That being the case, you could register all the like-sounding fictitious names your local authority will allow, and register all of the accompanying domains, and modify your DNS records for those new domains so that they all point to the same site.

4ndr3w is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply   

Bookmarks




Thread Tools

Get Updates
RSS Feeds:
RSS Feed for Viral Marketing RSS for this Category Only: Viral Marketing

RSS Feed for Small Business Ideas Forum RSS for Entire Forum
Forum Rules


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Small Business Ideas Forum


 
At Your Business - Small Business Directory
Free Business Forms - Prewritten Documents
 
Search Engine Guide
Small business guide to search marketing

 
Small Business Brief
Fetching the Best Small Business Info


Free Links - Free Advertising
Free Guide - Online Directory



Advertise your business here
Contact us for more details!


Semantic Juice
Register now to access free Quick SEO service!


Rocket Lawyer
Sign up for free 7 day trial. Boost your biz!


Buy UPC Codes
Get your products listed online!




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004 - 2018 - Privacy